Auropol
 

 

Polish Artists Residency In Auroville
Curated by Janek Simon and Joanna Sokołowska, Jarosław Lubiak (Museum of Art in Lodz)
Artists: Marta Deskur, Tomek Kowalski, Agnieszka Polska, Daniel Rumiancew, Andrzej Szpindler, Monika Zawadzki
March 3 – March 11, 2012
Kala Kendra Gallery, Auroville, India
www.auropol.com, www.auroville.org, www.msl.org.pl

The project is a collaboration between Muzeum Sztuki in Łódź, Gallery Square Circle, Kala Kendra: Bharat Nivas, Pavilion of India, Auroville, Tamil Nadu: India With support from the Adam Mickiewicz Institute and Goldex Poldex

Monika Zawadzki. “I Killed This Hen Especially For You” (1), 2012. Mural, 00 x 00 cm, acrylic paint, black. Kala Kendra Gallery, Auroville, India, 2012. Photo by Daniel Rumiancew

Monika Zawadzki. “Thali Plate”, 2012. Sculpture, 206 x 00 x 00 cm, stainless steel (0,0 cm), polished. Kala Kendra Gallery, Auroville, India, 2012. Photo by Daniel Rumiancew

Monika Zawadzki. “Thali Plate”, 2012. Sculpture, 206 x 00 x 00 cm, stainless steel (0,0 cm), polished. Kala Kendra Gallery, Auroville, India, 2012. Photo by Daniel Rumiancew

Works by Monika Zawadzki realised in a frame of AUROPOL

 

1. “I Killed This Hen Especially For You” (1), 2012. Mural, 00 x 00 cm, acrylic paint, black.
2. “Hammock”, 2012. Mural, 00 x 00 cm, acrylic paint, black.
3. “Thali Plate”, 2012. Sculpture, 206 x 00 x 00 cm, stainless steel (0,0 cm), polished.

 

1. Sentence from the movie “One Room Tennants” directed by Wojciech Has, 1960.

 

Prace Monika Zawadzki zrealizowane w ramach AUROPOL

 

1. „Specjalnie dla Ciebie zabiłam kurę” (1), 2012. Mural, 00 x 00 cm, akryl, czarny.
2. „Hamak”, 2012. Mural, 00 x 00 cm, akryl, czarny.
3. „Talerz Thali”, 2012. Rzeźba, 206 x 00 x 00 cm, stal nierdzewna (0,0 cm), wypolerowana.

 

1. Sentencja z filmu „Wspólny pokój” w reżyserii Wojciecha Hasa, 1960.

 

The project’s aim is to document the residency of a group of east European artists in Auroville, an experimental town in Southern India. It is meant to explore the inherent friction between certain dark elements of East European geographical identity and the bright reality of the utopian, optimistic experiment of Auroville. It is also meant to explore how the location might impact the attitudes, artistic personas or even the personalities of participating artists.

 

The question of how geographical location impacts the cultural output originating in a particular place has been widely discussed and examined across a number of disciplines, including cultural geography and contemporary art critiques. We see Eastern Europe as the home of Schultz and Kafka, long winters and endless lost wars, places full of mistery, historical trauma and despair. The Holocaust was inflicted on this region and the question remains whether culture can possibly continue to thrive after such a trauma. The Polish national narrative is in great part centered around the experience of Martyrdom. All these thems are intrinsic to the cultural output of the region, particularly countries like Poland and Hungary.

 

Auroville (City of Dawn) is an experimental township in South India founden in 1968 by a French woman named Mirra Alfassa (born Mira Richards), who came to be known as “The Mother” in her adopted home of India. The town was meant to be a universal place where people of all the nationalities and creeds can live in peace for the purpose of attaining unity across humanity. The town was designed by French architect Roger Anger under the direction of Alfassa and the Sri Aurobindo Society. Sri Aurobindo was a Indian nationalist, freedom fighter, philosopher, yogi, guru, known for his attempts to synthesise Eastern and Western philosophies and other disciplines.

 

“The Misja Auropol” project arises thus from multiple and interconnected traditions: from the religious traditions of India translated into the Western-European contexs (as Mira Alfassa first encountered them in France), but also from the progressive and utopian Western concepts influenced partly by Indian spirituality and further enacted in India.

 

Theoretical Background. There are two core theoretical concepts that shape the broader understanding of the project’s central themes:

 

Transversality (or transversal, derived from the writings of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari) refers to the interconnection of entities that have closed within themselves, seemingly without communication with the outside world. Transversals provide cimmunication among subjects that are othervise incommunicable. The function of transverals is to assemble multiplicies, yet in such a way that the differences among given entities or fragments are not wiped out, but intensified instead. These are passages that connect and intensity differences, singularities and distances between multiple locations in a heterogeneous multiplicity.

 

Friction (derived from the book by Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing entitledFriction: An Ethnography of Global Connection) refers to the way universal and local values interact and resulting transformations initiated by such encounters. Friction is a creative movement, involving multiple possible actions and reactions: conflicts, ruptures but also translations and unlikely reconfigurations.

 

Janek Simon (1), 2012

 

1. Visual artist and curator. He has been exploring wide range of subjects in his artistic practise for the last ten years – from repressed polish colonial past to catastrophe theory and DIY cultural politics. He co-runs alternative gallery and discussion space in Krakow called Goldex Poldex. Misja Auropol is his first full-blown film project, which he finds absolutely exciting.